18th Century Apple Fritters

I saw a post for a Zoom to make apple fritters.  I have been obsessed with apple fritters since I had amazing ones at the Alaska Psychiatric Institute in Anchorage in the 1980’s.  They had the best fritters!  (I was a student there at the time.)

But on further investigation these fritters are nothing like API’s.  They are sliced apples dunked in batter (with brandy in it) and fried.  So they look like donuts.  Here they are frying.


And here they are all cooked.  They are really yummy.  The apple inside is warm and flavorful, and the batter is good too.  I think I may make them again when we have fresh heritage apples from our orchard (which would be more authentic) but only 1/2 recipe.

As an aside, I have a birthday coming up on the 29th.  So I asked on facebook for birthday donations to the International Rescue Committee yesterday, and I have already received $100 in donations!  So I thought I would ask here as well.  I haven’t talked about the horrors of Ukraine yet on the blog, but we have been watching it.  It breaks my heart.  So these donations would be a nice birthday gift for me.   A colleague that works in international health care supports it so I feel it is a worthy organization.  Please let me know if you do donate.  It would make me feel better.

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6 Responses to 18th Century Apple Fritters

  1. Jeanne says:

    Your fritters look yummy! I used to buy fritters at Albertsons when we lived in Idaho. I’m not sure if they were deep fried or not. Of course, i can’t eat them now. Oh well.

    I admire your effort to help Ukraine’s people.

  2. When I was a kid, my mom called these apple donuts! Her fritters used grated or chopped apples.

    • Donna says:

      Apple donuts is a better description of them. I think everyone’s apple fritters now involve grated or chopped apples. But apparently in the 1700’s these were fritters.

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