COVID Times

We are living in incredible times.  Here are a couple of photos of me from work last night.

Michelle, Kelly and me fullMichelle, Kelly and me close

Everything in life seems so different and strange, but then you notice that nature is just chugging along like nothing is happening.  In fact, outside of our little worlds, things are better.  But in our worlds there is fear, loneliness and heartbreak.  But this is history in the making so I thought I would compile a list of the events in this amazing story.

Here is a timeline from Business Insider of the worldwide pandemic:

December 31, 2019
Chinese Health officials inform the WHO about a cluster of 41 patients with a mysterious pneumonia. Most are connected to Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market.

 

January 1, 2020
Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market closes.

 

January 7, 2020
Chinese authorities identify a new type of coronavirus (called novel coronavirus or nCoV).

 

January 11, 2020
China records its first death.

 

January 13, 2020
First coronavirus case outside of China is reported in Thailand.

 

January 20, 2020
First US case is reported: a 35-year-old man in Snohomish County, Washington.

 

January 23, 2020
Wuhan is placed under quarantine, Hubei province follows within days.

 

January 30, 2020
WHO declares a global public-health emergency.

 

January 31, 2020
President Trump bans foreign nationals from entering the US if they were in China within the prior two weeks.

 

February 2, 2020
First death outside China is recorded in the Philippines.

 

February 7, 2020
Chinese whistleblower Li Wenliang dies.

 

February 8, 2020
US citizen dies in Wuhan – first death of an American citizen.

 

February 9, 2020
Death toll in China surpasses that of the 2002-2003 SARS epidemic, with 811 deaths recorded.

 

February 11, 2020
WHO announces that the new coronavirus disease will be called “COVID-19.”

 

February 12, 2020
Coronavirus cases start to spike in South Korea.

 

February 19, 2020
Iran outbreak begins.

 

February 21, 2020
Italy outbreak begins.

 

February 29, 2020
US reports first death on American soil.

 

March 3, 2020
Coronavirus cases begin to sharply increase in Spain, marking the start of its outbreak.

 

March 8,  2020
Italy places all 60 million residents on lockdown.

 

March 11,  2020
WHO declared the outbreak a pandemic.

President Trump bans all travel from 26 European countries.

 

March 13,  2020
A US national emergency is declared over the novel coronavirus outbreak.

 

March 17,  2020
A leaked federal plan warns the new coronavirus pandemic “will last 18 months or longer” and may come in “multiple waves” of infections.

March 19,  2020

China reports no new locally spread infections for the first time since the pandemic began.

 

March 23,  2020
New York City confirms 21,000 cases, making it the biggest epicenter of the outbreak in the US.

 

March 26,  2020
Total confirmed cases in the US reach 82,404 — the highest in the world — surpassing China’s 81,782 and Italy’s 80,589.

 

March 27,  2020
Italy reports the highest single-day death toll for any country: 919.

 

March 31,  2020
More than 1/3 of humanity is under some form of lockdown.

Roughly 80% of all Americans are under lockdown, as 35 states issue stay-at-home orders.

 

April 1, 2020
Globally, authorities report almost 922,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, with about 656,000 being active and ongoing cases, roughly 193,000 recoveries, and 46,000 deaths.
And this is the Washington State timeline I created with the help of KIRO 7 the NEJM, MMWR and 2 articles from the New York Times.
On Jan. 7, the C.D.C. created an “incident management system” for the coronavirus and advised travelers to Wuhan to take precautions.
January 19
A 35-year-old man presented to an urgent care clinic in Snohomish County, Washington, with a 4-day history of cough and subjective fever. On checking into the clinic, the patient put on a mask in the waiting room. After waiting approximately 20 minutes, he was taken into an examination room and underwent evaluation by a provider. He disclosed that he had returned to Washington State on January 15 after traveling to visit family in Wuhan, China.
Jan. 20, just two weeks after Chinese scientists shared the genetic sequence of the virus, the C.D.C. had developed its own test, as usual, and deployed it to detect the country’s first coronavirus case. But soon after the F.D.A. cleared the C.D.C. to share its test kits with state health department labs, some discovered a problem. The third sequence, or “probe,” gave inconclusive results. While the C.D.C. explored the cause — contamination or a design issue — it told those state labs to stop testing.

Jan. 21

The first coronavirus case in the United States was confirmed in Washington state. “While originally thought to be spreading from animal-to-person, there are growing indications that limited person-to-person spread is happening,” a news release from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. “It’s unclear how easily this virus is spreading between people.”

Mid-February, the nation was testing only about 100 samples per day, according to the C.D.C.’s website.With capacity so limited, the C.D.C.’s criteria for who was tested remained extremely narrow for weeks to come: only people who had recently traveled to China or had been in contact with someone who had the virus.

The C.D.C. gave little thought to adopting the test being used by the W.H.O. The C.D.C.’s test was working in its own lab — still processing samples from states — which gave agency officials confidence. Dr. Anne Schuchat, the agency’s principal deputy director, would later say that the C.D.C. did not think “we needed somebody else’s test.” And the German-designed W.H.O. test had not been through the American regulatory approval process, which would take time.

The C.D.C. announced a plan on Feb. 14 to perform the screening in five high-risk cities: New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle.

Responding on Feb. 24 to a letter from 49 members of Congress about the need for testing in the states, he wrote, “CDC’s aggressive response enables us to identify potential cases early and make sure that they are properly handled.”

Feb. 25, Dr. Chu and her colleagues could not bear to wait any longer. They began performing coronavirus tests, without government approval.

By Feb. 26, Dr. Fauci was concerned that the stalled testing had become an urgent issue that needed to be addressed. He called Brian Harrison, Mr. Azar’s chief of staff, and asked him to gather the group of officials overseeing screening efforts.

Around noon on Feb. 27, Dr. Hahn, Dr. Redfield and top aides from the F.D.A. and H.H.S. dialed in to a conference call. Mr. Harrison began with an ultimatum: No one leaves until we resolve the lag in testing. We don’t have answers and we need them, one senior administration official recalled him saying. Get it done.  By the end of the day, the group agreed that the F.D.A. should loosen regulations so that hospitals and independent labs could move forward quickly with their own tests.

Feb. 29

At 9:38 a.m., Public Health – Seattle and King County confirmed the first coronavirus-related death in Washington, which also was the first in the United States. Word of the death was initially emailed to staff at EvergreenHealth in Kirkland, where the first patient died. Dozens of residents reported symptoms at Life Care Center in Kirkland, roughly 20 miles from downtown Seattle, and the first death was linked there. Jackson High School announced a Monday closure after a student had a presumptive positive test. Two people treated for the coronavirus at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane were released Jan. 21. Health officials said Feb. 29 that what we’re seeing is the tip of the iceberg.

March 1

A local postal service employee tested positive for the coronavirus. A man in his 70s with ties to Life Care Center of Kirkland was the second person to die from the coronavirus in King County. More schools announced closures, including Hazen High in Renton. Local Costcos were packed with people stocking up on toilet paper and supplies, and some locations sold out.

March 2

The coronavirus-related death count increased to six in Washington state. Public Health – Seattle and King County reported 14 new coronavirus cases, including five deaths. A student petition to close the University of Washington drew thousands of signatures.

March 3

The Washington state death toll increased to nine. Life Care in Kirkland, at 10101 N.E. 120th St., was the epicenter of the outbreak. A new coronavirus case in North Carolina was linked to King County after the person visited Life Care. Additional schools announced closures, including the Northshore School District, for up to 14 days. Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan declared a state of emergency.

March 4

The coronavirus death toll in Washington state increased to 10. King County Executive Dow Constantine recommended that pregnant people and people over 60 with underlying health conditions avoid crowds.

March 5

The death toll increased to 11. A CenturyLink Field employee who worked the Feb. 2 Seattle Dragons game tested positive for the coronavirus. The total case number increased to 70 statewide. That included 10 deaths from 51 cases in King County; 18 cases and one death in Snohomish County; and one death in Grant County. Snohomish County and Everett officials declared a state of emergency. Amazon employees in Seattle and Bellevue whose jobs can be done remotely were advised to work from home. Microsoft, Nordstrom and Starbucks corporate offices and Boeing also gave the same advice to workers.

March 6

Emerald City Comicon, which brings tens of thousands of visitors to Seattle and tens of millions of dollars to the local economy, was postponed. The University of Washington announced classes would no longer meet in person beginning the following Monday. That was the plan through the end of winter quarter. Seattle University, Seattle Pacific University and Bellevue College also announced classes would no longer meet in person. Pierce County health officials announced the first confirmed coronavirus case there.

March 7

For the first time since its start in 1972, the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Seattle and Irish Week events were canceled. The Washington coronavirus death total increased to 16, and there were at least 102 confirmed cases statewide.

March 8

A U.S. Department of Health and Human Services strike team started work at Life Care Center, the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in King County. Clark County confirmed its first case of the coronavirus after a man in his 70s tested positive for the virus. Inslee said Washington officials were considering mandatory social distancing measures to combat the coronavirus. The statewide totals increased to 123 people in eight Washington state counties. Grant County reported its first coronavirus death. King County announced two more coronavirus deaths.

March 9

The statewide death toll increased to 22 deaths. Jefferson County confirmed its first coronavirus case, which was a man who visited Life Care Center in Kirkland and traveled back to Jefferson County.  The number of deaths linked to Life Care Center in Kirkland increased to 19.

March 10

The new statewide coronavirus case number, as reported by health officials, reached at least 269. There were two new deaths reported in King County and 74 new cases there. The Snohomish Health District reported 17 new coronavirus cases, bringing its total to 54. It also announced a presumptive positive case at a Stanwood caregiving facility. There were reports that Inslee would ban gatherings of 250 people or more. Trevor Bedford, a computational biologist at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and collaborators at the University of Washington and the Institute for Disease Modeling were looking at the genome sequencing of 18 cases and the infection rate in the recent Seattle Flu Study. Based on that data, they believed there could be 1,100 active infections, Bedford told The Associated Press.

March 11

Inslee banned gatherings of more than 250 people in King, Pierce and Snohomish counties, including weddings.  The Shoreline and Lake Washington school districts also closed through the end of March. Everett and Bellevue public schools announced a closure for the month starting March 13. The Sounders postponed their March 21 match, and the Mariners were working with Major League Baseball on how to handle games. The Woodland Park Zoo closed for the month. The death toll rose to 31 deaths from 374 confirmed cases statewide. That included 27 deaths from 235 cases in King County. Of those deaths, at least 23 were linked to Life Care Center in Kirkland. The Snohomish County toll increased to three deaths from 75 cases. The coronavirus was known to have spread to 13 Washington counties.

March 12

The statewide death count increased to 31 from 457 total cases. King County had 27 of those deaths from 270 cases. Gov. Jay Inslee said all schools in King, Pierce and Snohomish counties would close through April 24. Some Seattle hospitals banned visitors. The Space Needle temporarily suspended its operations until March 31. Boeing said it was going on a hiring freeze amid the coronavirus crisis. The Seattle Art Museum announced it would temporarily close its three sites effective Friday until March 31.

March 13

Evergreen Health Hospital announced it is canceling elective surgeries per CDC guidelines. Critical and necessary surgeries will still take place. The hospital said the elective surgeries are being suspended to conserve resources, people and supplies. Inslee said all Washington schools would be closed until April 24, so the first day back would be April 27. Dr. Jeff Duchin, public health officer in Seattle and King County, tweeted Friday evening that, “All hospitals need to urgently prepare for a surge in critically ill patients.” Officials with Seattle Children’s Hospital said it is limiting visitors to a maximum of two primary caregivers for each patient to help protect against possible exposure to the coronavirus. A second University of Washington student in as many days has tested positive for the coronavirus. An employee at the Monroe Correctional Facility tested positive this week for COVID-19.

 

March 14

The Washington State Department of Health reported 40 deaths and 642 confirmed cases of coronavirus. Public Health – Seattle & King County reported 60 new cases, bringing the case count in the county to 388. Three new deaths were reported, bringing the county total to 35. Seven new COVID-19 cases were announced in Pierce County. Laboratory tests have been made more broadly available. King County health officials said anyone with a fever and cough should assume their illness could be COVID-19. Forty-Seven Life Care workers tested positive for the coronavirus. University of Washington Medicine postponed elective surgeries as it is faced with an unprecedented need to respond to the coronavirus pandemic. A Seattle Dragons XFL player tested positive for the coronavirus, the team confirmed. The Pac-12 Conference canceled all spring sports and championships amid coronavirus concerns.

March 15

The death toll in the state reached 42, with 772 confirmed cases. Public Health – Seattle & King County reported 37 deaths and 420 confirmed cases in the county, with 29 of the deaths linked to Life Care Center of Kirkland. Gov. Inslee announced that all entertainment and recreational facilities, including gyms, will close, as well as bars and restaurants; however, restaurants will be allowed to do take out and delivery. King County health officials warned the blood supply could collapse due to the emergency. Starbucks announced it is temporarily closing some stores nationwide for at least two weeks and will shift others to a to-go model. A Pike Place community member tested positive for the coronavirus, as well as a Sounders FC support staffer. An EvergeenHealth physician was diagnosed with COVID-19.

March 16

The total number of coronavirus cases in Washington state was 904 with at least 48 deaths, according to the Department of Health. A Seattle woman became the first person in the country to receive an experimental coronavirus vaccine through Kaiser Permanente. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau closed the border to non-citizens amid the pandemic. It was announced an Evergreen Health emergency room doctor tested positive, and that doc in his 40s was in critical but stable condition.

March 17

The Department of Health’s updated numbers had at least 1,009 cases statewide with 54 deaths. Inslee signed multiple coronavirus relief bills. A University of Washington faculty member tested positive for the coronavirus, bringing the number of cases in the campus community to nine.

March 18

The Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department reported the county’s first coronavirus death. The state Department of Health numbers increased to 66 deaths from 1,187 cases, not including the Pierce County death. Inslee announced a 30-day statewide moratorium on evictions. The Seattle International Film Festival was cancelled. The Washington Department of Social and Health Services confirmed a patient at Western State Hospital in Lakewood tested positive for COVID-19.

March 19

The Department of Health reported at least 74 deaths from 1,376 coronavirus cases. The first death in Lewis County was announced. Pierce County announced 19 new coronavirus cases, but no new deaths Thursday. Snohomish County announced one more death, moving its total to seven.  The Whatcom County Health Department reported the first death in that county, a man in his 60s. The Washington Distillers Guild announced several small, family-owned distilleries have banded together, converting their operations to make thousands of gallons of hand sanitizer for nurses and doctors taking care of patients.

March 20

The Department of Health updated their statewide count to 81 deaths from 1,512 cases. King County announced 100 new cases and seven new deaths. Pierce County had eight new cases; Thurston County had two new cases; Snohomish County had 37 new cases and one new death Friday. Inslee sent a letter to President Trump requesting a federal major disaster declaration.  Gov. Jay Inslee did not issue a shelter-in-place order during his Friday afternoon news briefing, but said he could take legally binding action if people did not take proper steps for social distancing.  The mayor of Everett issued a directive Friday instructing all residents to stay home, with exceptions for essential activities. The order, which takes effect at noon Monday, tells everyone to stay home except for necessary errands, walks and caring for friends and relatives. Essential businesses, such as grocery stores, pharmacies, child care and banks, can remain open.

March 21

Pierce County reported 12 new coronavirus cases. The Department of Health updated its statewide count to 94 deaths from 1,793 cases. Of those, 74 deaths were in King County deaths from 934 cases. Gov. Jay Inslee diverted masks being sold on shelves at local Target stores to Washington health care workers in need of safety equipment.  Local grocery stores started special hours for seniors. The State Department of Corrections announced plans to produce protective hospital gowns to help with the nationwide shortage.

March 22

President Trump approved the state’s disaster declaration. Washington campgrounds were closed through the end of April. The mayor of Edmonds issued a stay-at-home order that started at 11:59 p.m.

March 23

Boeing announced a temporary suspension of production at its Puget Sound facilities. In their daily update, the State Department of Health reported 110 deaths among 2,221 cases. In a 5:30 p.m. statewide address, Gov. Jay Inslee directed Washington residents to stay home by executive order. Inslee’s executive order had exceptions for essential critical infrastructure workers, including first responders. Grocery stores, pharmacies, convenience stores, liquor stores that sell food, food banks and farmers’ markets were among businesses that could stay open. People also could go outside for exercise, but Inslee also said people should not make a run on the grocery store to overstock.

March 24

The State Department of Health reported a new total of 123 deaths from 2,469 cases. The Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department reports 12 new cases, no new deaths. The Snohomish Health District reported five new deaths among 95 new cases. Public Health – Seattle and King County reported seven new “estimated” deaths among 107 new “estimated” cases. It was announced that a TSA officer at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport tested positive for the coronavirus.

After conversations with the F.D.A. in mid-February, the company received emergency approval for its BioFire test on March 24.

March 25

The State Department of Health’s numbers increased to 132 deaths from 2,580 cases. All non-essential businesses closed. The DOH also said 34,292 people were tested in Washington, and the 2,580 positive tests are 7% of those.

March 26

More than 133,000 people in Washington filed for unemployment benefits in the previous week, The Associated Press reported. State Department of Health numbers rose to 147 deaths from 3,207 cases. Of those cases, 15 deaths were reported as new. Whatcom County and Pierce County each reported two new coronavirus deaths. King County reported nine new deaths and 218 new cases.

March 27

The Department of Health updated its statewide count to 175 deaths from 3,700 cases.

March 28

Everett’s Angel of the Winds Arena was being converted to a coronavirus quarantine site. It was announced a King County Metro driver tested positive for the coronavirus. Gov. Jay Inslee and Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan talked about the deployment of a new field hospital at the CenturyLink Field Event Center. The Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department reported 55 new cases there. Public Health – Seattle and King County reported 11 new deaths and 249 new coronavirus cases. The State Department of Health increased its counts to 189 deaths from 4,300 cases.  Three of the largest homeless shelters in the Seattle area were closed.

March 29

King County issued a new order that threatened involuntary detention for those who refused to isolate after testing positive for the coronavirus. Public Health – Seattle and King County reported five new deaths and 82 new coronavirus cases. The Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department reported one new death and 36 new coronavirus cases.  Gov. Jay Inslee said Washington still needed more help from the federal government. Local animal shelters were closed. The Spokane Regional Health District reported two new deaths and seven new coronavirus cases in Spokane County. Michigan State Rep. Isaac Robinson, who represented a part of Detroit, died of a suspected coronavirus infection. The Washington State Department of Health increased their county to at least 195 deaths among 4,896 coronavirus cases.

March 30

Snohomish County updated their counts to 31 total deaths among 1,127 coronavirus cases. The Washington State Department of Health did not release an updated coronavirus case and death count.

April 1
MMWR report released of Presymptomatic Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 — Singapore, January 23–March 16, 2020

Here is the Skagit County COVID-19 timelines per Skagit Breaking:

The Skagit Valley College has announced that all classes have been cancelled for Tuesday, March 10th, 2020.  Currently, no members of the Skagit Valley College community have been diagnosed with COVID-19, however, earlier today  the college was notified that the Snohomish County Health District is Investigating a presumptive positive test for the COVID-19 virus involving a resident of the Josephine Sunset Home in Stanwood, Washington.  Nine Skagit Valley College Students and two faculty in their Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) program have been participating in clinical instruction at Josephine Sunset Home in Stanwood since February 5th, 2020.

Today, in a proactive step to facilitate coordination with state and local partners, the Skagit County Board of Commissioners declared a public health emergency on COVID-19. This will allow Skagit County to take the immediate steps necessary to prepare and respond appropriately to this State outbreak.  Additionally, at a meeting of the Skagit County Board of Health, Skagit County Health Officer, Dr. Howard Leibrand, issued recommendations in order to slow the spread of COVID-19 and reduce the number of people infected. These recommendations were made in consultation with the State Department of Health and align with similar recommendations from neighboring jurisdictions.
Dr. Leibrand has recommended – but is not requiring – the following:People at higher risk of severe illness should stay home and away from large groups of people as much as possible. People at higher risk include people over 60 years of age; people with underlying health conditions including heart disease, lung disease or diabetes; people with weakened immune systems; and pregnant women.Employers should maximize telecommuting options for as many employees as possible; urge employees to stay home when they are sick and maximize flexibility in sick leave benefits; consider staggering start and end times to reduce large numbers of people congregating at the same time.The community should postpone non-essential events and gatherings of ten or more people.The Health Officer is not recommending school closures, but individual districts may make the decision to close schools as the situation evolves. Skagit County Public Health will continue to be available for organizational consultation on these important and difficult decisions.

Fast forward to 9:30 for the Health Department presentation:

https://skagit.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=8&clip_id=3282&autostart=1&embed=1

The first case of COVID-19 or Coronavirus Disease 2019 has been confirmed in Skagit County, Washington.   According to Skagit County Public Health, they were notified today of the first positive case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus or COVID-19. The patient is a female in her 40’s and is at home on isolation. The individual appears to have acquired COVID-19 through community transmission.

 

March 12, 2020

In an effort to proactively position the City to mobilize any necessary COVID-19 response plans, Mayor Boudreau has signed a proclamation of emergency for the City of Mount Vernon.

 

Skagit Regional Health in conjunction with Skagit Public Health is asking people with symptoms of cough and fever to stay home and call their medical provider for direction instead of coming into the local emergency rooms or walk-in clinics. It is very important that people with respiratory illness call ahead and get triaged over the phone before visiting a local emergency room or walk-in clinic. In addition to asking people to call ahead before visiting healthcare providers, Skagit Regional Health is also offering FREE Online virtual visits  through their telehealth system, MyEClinic, for anyone with respiratory illnesses.

All Skagit County public schools to close March 17 to April 24 due to COVID – 19

Skagit Regional Health staff and providers are officially caring for patients who have tested positive for Covid-19.  According to a release on their website, they are treating these patients with appropriate precautions for their staff, and their  staff regularly cares for patients with respiratory conditions and those who require isolation. The staff are well trained, practiced and properly equipped to care for patients with Covid-19.

The Mount Vernon Thousand Trails RV Campground located at 5409 N. Dark Lane in Bow, Washington has notified members and guests via a letter dated on March 11th, 2020,  that a guest of the campground has recently tested positive for the COVID-19.   Campground Manager, Elaine O’Neal wrote in the letter  the individual remains in isolation and is not utilizing any of the campground facilities but they feel it is important to notify guests of the information.

According to the Skagit County.net website,  as of 3:30 p.m. on March 16th, 2020 there are currently seven (7) confirmed cases, including 1 person who is hospitalized as a result of the coronavirus. The three new cases since yesterday include a male in his 70’s, a female in her 60’s, a male in his 40’s.   All three cases remain under investigation for possible places they have been in Skagit County. Previously Skagit County Public Health had identified a male in his 30’s,  a male in his 20’s, a female in her 30’s and a female in her 40’s as testing positive for COVID-19. All for subjects were listed as being in isolation at home.

All Skagit County Residents should review the updated information posted on the Skagitcounty.net website, as Community Transmission of COVID-19 is occurring in Skagit County at a rate higher than the confirmed case count indicates. Confirmation of cases through laboratory screening is not able to keep pace with ongoing community transmission. As has happened in other counties in Washington State, the virus keeps spreading from person to person as we continue to have close contact with others.

Skagit Public Health is asking ALL SKAGIT COUNTY RESIDENTS to do what they can to slow the spread of COVID-19, which will mean serious disruptions to daily life for everyone. Our local businesses and service providers have made big changes to their operations to limit close personal contact. Public Health is asking that everybody do this in their personal lives as well. Although many public activities and events have been suspended, it is important that we postpone or cancel social activities too. With school out and some businesses experiencing temporary closures, this is not a time to expand family visits and social gatherings.

It is critical to minimize the number of people who get seriously ill at the same time. If too many people get sick at once, this will put a high burden on our healthcare system. We must all take action so that healthcare is there when we need it. Remember, a serious illness or injury could happen to any of us at any time.

In alignment with recommendations from the State, the Skagit County Health Officer has released new, additional guidance to help stop the spread of COVID-19: 

*People at higher risk of severe illness should self-isolate now. This includes physical isolation from non-household family members, including grandchildren.

*The community should postpone all non-essential events and gatherings – both informal and formal. Fundraisers, weddings, lunchroom gatherings, book groups, service clubs, retirement parties, and other social activities are considered non-essential. Contact Skagit County Public Health for guidance at 360-416-1500 if you plan to hold any gathering outside of your immediate household members.

Parents should not arrange large playdates, sleepovers, or parties and keep their kids home. Kids should play outside to stay healthy and active.

 

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, there are now nine positive cases in Skagit County and two of those cases have resulted in hospitalization.  The latest residents to test positive are a female in her 80’s and a female in her 30’s.  The female in her 30’s is currently hospitalized in Skagit County.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County.  According to the SkagitCounty.net website, there are now fourteen (14)  positive cases in Skagit County and two of those cases have resulted in hospitalization.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, there are now eighteen (18) positive cases in Skagit County and three of those cases have resulted in hospitalization. Skagit County has not had any confirmed deaths as a result of COVID-19, but neighboring Island County, has had their first death from COVID-19.

 

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, there are now twenty six  (26) positive cases in Skagit County and three of those cases have resulted in hospitalization. Skagit County has not had any confirmed deaths as a result of COVID-19.  

 

Washington State COVID-19 cases as of 3:00 p.m. on  March 20th, 2020 are now at 1,524 cases statewide, with 83 reported deaths.  Skagit County currently ranks fourth in the State with 26 cases, according to the Skagit County Department of Health website.

Skagit County Public Health is investigating a cluster of recently confirmed COVID-19 cases that has been traced to a group meeting of approximately 60 people in early March. Case investigation indicates that more than half of attendees who were at this gathering are now confirmed or probable cases of COVID-19.  Public Health is contacting all symptomatic and asymptotic attendees of this meeting, as well as close contacts of symptomatic attendees. Meeting attendees and close contacts have been advised to quarantine or isolate themselves as appropriate.  If you have not been contacted by Public Health, you were not an attendee of this meeting or close contact of an attendee. Public Health continues to receive and investigate notifications of new laboratory confirmed cases unrelated to this cluster. The community should expect to see a significant increase in the number of confirmed Skagit County COVID-19 cases in the coming days.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, as of 1:43 p.m. on March 21st, 2020, there are now twenty Eight  (28) positive cases in Skagit County and four (4) of those cases have resulted in hospitalization. Skagit County has not had any confirmed deaths as a result of COVID-19.

A resident of the Chandler’s Square Retirement Community in Anacortes, Washington has tested positive for COVID-19. The individual is hospitalized at Island Hospital and is expected to be released to stay with a family member, where they will remain in isolation. One additional resident is hospitalized and being evaluated.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, as of 2:00 p.m. on March 22nd, 2020, there are now thirty four (34) positive cases in Skagit County and five (5) of those cases have resulted in hospitalization. Skagit County has not had any confirmed deaths as a result of COVID-19.

Today, Skagit County Public Health was notified that a resident who previously tested positive for COVID-19 has passed away. The individual was a female in her 80s. This is the first COVID-19 death of a Skagit County resident and is related to the cluster of cases reported on March 21st.  “We are very sad to have to report this first death,” said Skagit County Health Officer Dr. Howard Leibrand. “My thoughts are with her family and friends as they grieve this loss.”  The individual was a patient at Skagit Valley Hospital.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County.  According to the SkagitCounty.net website, as of 2:10 p.m. on March 23rd,  2020, there are now Forty Five (45)   Confirmed positive cases of COVID-19  in Skagit County and five (5) of those cases have resulted in hospitalization. 1 Skagit County Resident has died from the virus. She was described as being a woman in her 80’s, who had been hospitalized at Skagit Valley Hospital in Mount Vernon.

A doctor who sees patients at Life Care Center of Skagit Valley, located at 1462 Cascade Highway in Sedro Woolley,  has tested positive for COVID-19 according to a statement from Melissa Nelson, Executive Director for Life Care Center of Skagit Valley.  “Any resident or associate who interacted with the doctor while in our center has been notified,” said Nelson.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, as of 3:10 p.m. on March 24th, 2020, there are now Forty Eight (48) Confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Skagit County and five (5) of those cases have resulted in hospitalization.

Skagit Regional Health has publicly announced they are now accepting donations of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE),  as well as monetary donations, during this unprecedented crisis involving the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in our community.  In an announcement on their website,  Skagit Regional Health says they have received numerous inquiries and offers of support from the community for the work of the Skagit Regional Health Care givers.   They  are now accepting donated items, such as, Isolation Gowns, Exam Gloves (Non-Latex, Medical Grade ONLY-We cannot use industrial gloves.) Thermometers, N95 Masks, Surgical (Disposable Masks Only, No Cloth Masks), Sealed Goggles and Face Shields.

 

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, as of 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 25th, 2020  there are now Sixty Three (63) Confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Skagit County and six (6) of those cases have resulted in hospitalization.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, as of 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 26th, 2020 there are now Seventy Eight  (78).

Earlier this month, before strict social distancing requirements were in place in many parts of Washington State, members of the Skagit Valley Chorale were already taking coronavirus precautions.  The group told singers not to attend practice or performances if they had even a hint of the illness.

The Choir group met on March 10th, 2020 for practice. The Chorale has around 120 members and around 60 people attended the practice. Of those 60 people,  45 have developed symptoms of the Covid-19 virus and 27 (so far) have tested positive. One of the choir group’s members has died, another has been hospitalized and several others have struggled to recover from the illness.

According to a statement to the New York Times  by Ruth Backlund, co-president at the Skagit Valley Chorale,  the group was monitoring public health guidelines at the time of the practice and many had asked people to stay home if they showed even minor signs of the illness.

According to the article, the group had gathered in rows facing a piano and a choir director. They were all in individual chairs and had space to keep one another separated. There was extra soap dispensers in the bathrooms for people to wash their hands, said Backlund.  “Nobody was sick. Nobody touched anybody. Nobody shook hands. Nobody hugged everybody like you might do in a group. there was none of that.”

Skagit County Public Health Communicable Disease and Environmental Health Manager, Polly Dubbel, told the New York Times, “the case was a disturbing example of how contagious coronavirus can be and how it can spread among groups even when no one is symptomatic.  It’s really too high risk for people to gather close together, this just really illustrates that.”

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, as of 3:00 p.m. on Friday, March 27th, 2020 there are now Ninety one (91) Confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Skagit County and six (8) of those cases have resulted in hospitalization.

 

One resident and five staff members have tested positive for COVID-19 at Prestige Care and Rehabilitation located at 1036 E. Victoria Avenue in Burlington. Prestige Care is working diligently to respond to this situation, and we ask the community to offer only respect and support during this difficult time. This will allow the facility to focus its attention on protecting residents and staff.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their information on Positive Cases of COVID-19 or coronavirus within the County. According to the SkagitCounty.net website, as of 1:40  p.m. on Saturday, March 28th, 2020 there are now Ninety seven (97) Confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Skagit County and eight (8) of those cases have resulted in hospitalization. 3 Skagit County Resident have now  died from the virus.  As of yesterday, Skagit County had 91 confirmed cases.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their website today to reflect the Positive Cases of COVID-19 or Coronavirus in the County. According to SkagitCounty.net, as of 4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 30th,  2020, there are One Hundred Twenty one (121) confirmed Positive cases of COVID-19 in Skagit County, resulting in at least 9 hospitalizations and 3 confirmed deaths.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their website today to reflect the Positive Cases of COVID-19 or Coronavirus in the County. According to SkagitCounty.net, as of 2:45  p.m. on Tuesday, March 31st, 2020, there are One Hundred Twenty eight(128) confirmed Positive cases of COVID-19 in Skagit County, resulting in at least 13 hospitalizations and 3 confirmed deaths. As of yesterday, Skagit County Public Health had said there were 121 confirmed Positive cases in the County and 9 reported hospitalizations.

Skagit County Public Health has updated their website today to reflect the Positive Cases of COVID-19 or Coronavirus in the County. According to SkagitCounty.net, as of 2:45  p.m. on Wednesday, April 1st, there are One Hundred Forty Three (143) confirmed Positive cases of COVID-19 in Skagit County, resulting in at least 14 hospitalizations and 4 confirmed deaths. As of yesterday, Skagit County Public Health had said there were 128 confirmed Positive cases in the County and 13 reported hospitalizations.

It is amazing that it has only been one month that we have been knowingly dealing with this virus in Skagit County.  It seems like so much longer.  But those of us that are safe/lucky enough will be able to tell future generations about these amazing times.

 

PS

For those likely very few of you that are interested in even more information about this global pandemic, I had added some resources that I use to follow it:

Johns Hopkins global COVID map  https://www.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html?fbclid=IwAR1eNwIu4egQOvteEHUz0nA3BfHuBzJ4h0klUKKabLW_ZexmYYnTjdoGqvg#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

Washington State COVID cases by county  http://schdatascience.org/

UW Virology COVID-19 Dashboard  http://depts.washington.edu/labmed/covid19/

Pediatric COVID literature review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/research/coronavirus/docsum?text=pediatric  if you change the search  from relevance to recency you get the latest publications

 

 

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6 Responses to COVID Times

  1. Teresa says:

    These really are scary times. I am grateful for people like you and your co-workers who are still out there helping people. Stay safe. Virtual hugs.

    Like

  2. Jeanne says:

    Donna, I finally got to read this! It’s long, but interesting. And very scary!!
    I just learned yesterday, that my sister, living in a small care home in Puyallup, WA, may test positive, because one of the six residents of the home, did test positive and was taken to the hospital. The health department will be going to test the other residents as well as the staff. It’s very upsetting.

    Like

  3. Jeanne says:

    Donna, I finally got to read this! It’s long, but interesting. And very scary!!
    I just learned yesterday, that my sister, living in a small care home in Puyallup, WA, may test positive, because one of the six residents of the home, did test positive and was taken to the hospital. The health department will be going to test the other residents as well as the staff. It’s very upsetting.

    Like

  4. edochie99 says:

    It is unfortunate time.First United States death was actually February 6th 2020 in San Jose, California but was reported much later.

    Liked by 1 person

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